Posts tagged “nike

DORODESIGN Likes: NIKE AIR MAX 1 MC SP – “DESERT CAMO – USA” | RELEASE INFO

Since we are on the subject of camouflage, Stockholm’s SneakerNStuff recently announced that it will launch the Nike Air Max 1 SP “Desert Camo USA” starting tomorrow, February 15, through its two retail locations and online store. Similar to its Nike Air Max 90 Sneakerboot MC SP counterpart, the Nike Air Max 1 MC SP features the same three-color desert camouflage used by the United States Armed Forces, which Nike Sportswear referred to with a sewn-on American flag on the sockliner. Like the Air Max 90 Sneakerboot also, it has a seamless construct with durable canvas and rugged outsole thanks in part to its Nike Hyperfuse construct. Available in just a few hours through SneakerNStuff, this special “Country Camo” edition will be making its way to other Nike Sportswear retailers around the globe soon.

Nike Air Max 1 MC SP
Style: 667401-220
Color: Sand/Sand/Bison

Release Date: February 15, 2014 (Tomorrow!)

SneakersNStuff Stockholm
Åsögatan 124 | Map
116 24 Stockholm Sweden

SneakersNStuff Malmö
Davidshallsgatan 19 | Map
211 45 Malmö Sweden

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DORODESIGN likes: NIKE Free Flyknit Running Shoes

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NIKE: free flyknit running shoes
all images courtesy NIKE

 

This week in Oregon has taken place the 2013 NIKE innovation summit, as the brand unveiled the new NIKE free flyknit running shoes. The NIKE free flyknit will be available globally from august 1st, we have just preordered it now!

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Sean McDowell, creative director of NIKE running, tell more about the new shoe:

 

Please could you explain the concept behind free flyknit?
NIKE free flyknit is an expression of natural performance principles, combining a supportive, sock-like upper and a flexible midsole and outsole that move with the body. The compression fit brings the foot closer to the sole for better lockdown and propulsion.

This shoe is about enhancing what nature gave us – humans were ‘designed’ to run on soft terrain but now most running is done on hard surfaces, this shoe feels so light and so well cushioned it’s as close to running in a sock as you can get – so to your mind your feet feel ‘free’ – but it also provides all the support you need.

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How does this shoe follow on from your recent innovations in running shoes?
SM: It’s another  example of a continuing trend in running – where the equipment be it shoes or apparel are moving with the body. We used to put more things on shoes to give you support and stability and now we are freeing things up. New materials like flyknit and flywire allow us to strip away anything that’s unnecessary and keep the shoe simple in terms of the number of parts.’

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How long does the design process take?
SM: There is a research period where we meet with athletes and review what they think of our existing footwear – we listen to what they tell us and study how they perform using our equipment. From this feedback and observations we get to work. Then there is about an eighteen-month period before the shoe goes to market. With this product we had time to take a look at the success of the previous free range and the support offered by flyknit and really develop something that raises the bar. We went through fifteen final iterations of this shoe before we settled on this design.

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Flyknit details – men’s

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NIKE flyknit upper
A new, more compressive NIKE flyknit construction in the shoe upper secures the runner’s foot to the shoe platform. The unique zoned performance mapping pattern of the NIKE flyknit upper is derived from insights on how pressure is exerted on the top of the foot. NIKE sport research lab scientists employed pressure-mapping technology to locate stress areas, and designers used the data to inform the new upper. Zones on the top of the foot have engineered stretch built to enable natural flex, while a tighter weave at the perimeter stabilizes the forefoot and heel. Additionally, elasticized construction fits securely around the ankle for a comfortable, secure fit. By knitting a one-piece upper, NIKE flyknit construction reduces NIKE’s typical upper waste by an average of 88 percent.

 

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NIKE free platform
The advanced NIKE flyknit upper sits atop a NIKE free+ 5.0 midsole, which lies in the middle of the NIKE free spectrum, providing mid-range cushioning. (On a scale or 1-10, 1 is akin to running barefoot and 10 is comparable to a traditional running shoe.) The articulated NIKE free sole is flexible and moves naturally with the foot. Diagonal hot-knifed sipes (strategically-engineered flex grooves) through the arch help ensure natural movement in the mid-foot as a runner transitions stride.

 

The NIKE free flyknit comes on the heels of decades of biomechanics research and design exploration with the intent of providing the best run possible. The breakthrough combination of a compressive NIKE flyknit upper with a highly flexible NIKE free midsole and outsole adds up to a running shoe that delivers a more natural ride, amplifying athletes’ ability to move quickly and comfortably over distance.

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via designboom


DORODESIGN LIKES: Nike Extreme – Just Experience It

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When you are Nike, you just do it. There’s absolutely no point being timid or ordinary. You blaze trails, create trends, draw attention.

Here at Access, we are creating Nike Extreme experiences around the globe. Here are a few of our concepts in which we use the Nike singular swoosh power to create serious buzz. The kind of buzz that goes viral because people love it. Because they are having fun doing it.

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This kind of concept/campaign ticks all the boxes. It creates a unique, fun offline experience and then shares it with the online world. You film it, and that becomes the TV ad; you photograph it and that becomes the print ad; and both are used in online and social network campaigns. Put all those together with individual participants’ own social network buzz and you have a run-away funfest across channels.

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But it all starts with an offline experience that is big enough to create that initial pick-up spontaneously and authentically. It must be worth their while. Then people will talk about it online, bloggers will feature it, and the rest of media will cover it. When serious, authentic viral kicks in, it proves that consumers loved what you did and want to share it. That is worth more than any push campaign result because it has become THEIR experience.

NIKEEXTREME

We start with a swoosh-shaped Nike Extreme Swoosh Toboggan Ride – a toboggan slide shaped like the swoosh. Of course, the toboggans themselves are shaped like swooshes, too. You can try this at the coolest ski resorts of the world.

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As it isn’t snowing everywhere, those more inclined to enjoy themselves on the beach get to try the Nike Extreme Swoosh Slide. A fun and bouncy inflatable megaslide in the shape of the swoosh, appearing at the world’s coolest beaches.

And who would want to remain bound to the ground? Not those who take off in the Nike Extreme Swoosh Hot Air Balloon. Flying over big cities, the Swoosh can be seen from miles around. When you’ve ticked off all three from your “Must-do Fun” list, you’ll probably be in the need of some new Nikes and you’ll certainly have something to talk about. – Bill Tikos

 

via TheCoolHunter


DORODESIGN LIKES: Selling Spaces: new directions in retail design

In spite of the rise of e-commerce, the physical point of sale is still with us. That said, the traditional store is having to up its game in terms of the experience and brand relevance it offers consumers – not only to compete with online shopping but also to support it.

Japanese design studio Nendo takes a concept-led approach to the design of the 24 Issey Miyake store in Tokyo’s Shibuya Parco, using clusters of steel rods to turn the functional display of goods into something far more sculptural

Japanese design studio Nendo takes a concept-led approach to the design of the 24 Issey Miyake store in Tokyo’s Shibuya Parco, using clusters of steel rods to turn the functional display of goods into something far more sculptural

It’s not uncommon these days to hear about a high-street retail brand going to the wall. And long-standing ones at that. No surprise really, given the less than favourable financial straits most national economies are currently in. Internet shopping – although not unaffected by sluggish, if indeed negative, sales growth – continues to gain ground at the expense of its analogue counterpart, the physical point of sale.
Yet, we’re far from witnessing the end for the traditional, non-virtual shop. Retail footfall may ebb and flow, but stores, as real-time spaces to which consumers deliver themselves and where they – if things go according to plan – part with their money, continue to serve a purpose.lncc01-bearbeitet

The LN-CC (Late Night Chameleon Café) store in Dalston, London, takes a theatrical, highly curated approach to retail design. Conceived of by set designer Gary Card, the shop delivers visitors to its product rooms via a wooden tunnel

The LN-CC (Late Night Chameleon Café) store in Dalston, London, takes a theatrical, highly curated approach to retail design. Conceived of by set designer Gary Card, the shop delivers visitors to its product rooms via a wooden tunnel

But what is that purpose exactly in 2012? If anything’s clear, it’s that the point of sale, as we know it, is moving beyond its historical function as a quasi-public space for the mere display and provision of goods and services to something altogether more sophisticated and plural. And the internet is without a doubt playing a key role in this evolution.

What’s the key difference between online and in-store shopping? Physical space. Japanese office NI&Co. Architects’ micro-architectural design for the Bianco Nero boutique in Osaka treats visitors to a memorable spatial experience; photo Yuko Tada

What’s the key difference between online and in-store shopping? Physical space. Japanese office NI&Co. Architects’ micro-architectural design for the Bianco Nero boutique in Osaka treats visitors to a memorable spatial experience; photo Yuko Tada

Smart brands, however, don’t consider this to be the death-knell of the physical point of sale – the store – but rather as a challenge to reimagine its meaning. If everything’s cheaper on the internet, how do you make real-time, real-place shops meaningful? How do you turn online brand fans back into analogue consumers?
As human interaction becomes increasingly abstracted and virtual thanks to the rise of social media, interaction brings with it transaction. E-commerce seems to offer the perfect package: competitive pricing, convenience in terms of where and when you can shop, and a reduced environmental impact (allegedly).

Commissioned by established London department store Selfridges to design its new designer menswear space, architect Alex Cochrane has created, as part of its scheme, a geometric sculpture that stretches across the room’s ceiling

Commissioned by established London department store Selfridges to design its new designer menswear space, architect Alex Cochrane has created, as part of its scheme, a geometric sculpture that stretches across the room’s ceiling

One answer is to get all architectural on your shoppers, to transform the conventional store visit into a memorable spatial encounter that truly engages, delights and challenges. Such an approach – the concept-led, interior-architecturally considered retail space – is perhaps nowhere more in evidence than in Japan, where a number of architecture and design offices, such as celebrated practice Nendo, have realised retail environments that elicit emotional and even intellectual responses on the part of consumers, producing a conscious awareness of being-in-space.

Japanese design studio Nendo have delivered a memorable concept for men’s suit brand Halsuit’s Okayama store, conflating retail space with office space. Its display system is made up playfully of conference tables, chairs and task lamps

Japanese design studio Nendo have delivered a memorable concept for men’s suit brand Halsuit’s Okayama store, conflating retail space with office space. Its display system is made up playfully of conference tables, chairs and task lamps

Nendo’s retail designs for fashion brands Issey Mikaye or Halsuit are just two examples of what Nicole Srock-Stanley, managing director of the Berlin-based brand-architecture agency dan Pearlman describes as ‘the authentic’: playful, added-value environments that seduce, reconnecting visitors with the idea of offline consumption.
But to think of the traditional point of sale on the one hand and e-commerce on the other as some kind of binary, both somehow in competition, would be to misunderstand the mutually informing relation that these two channels or environments increasingly share. Take the British luxury brand Burberry, for example, which Business Weekly ranks in the top 100 most valuable brands globally.

Online communities of fans are invited to become in-house, real-time patrons at Burberry’s new flagship store on London’s Regent Street. Seamlessly integrated digital technology includes a 7-metre-high laser-phosphor screen for live web streaming…

Online communities of fans are invited to become in-house, real-time patrons at Burberry’s new flagship store on London’s Regent Street. Seamlessly integrated digital technology includes a 7-metre-high laser-phosphor screen for live web streaming…

When it came to launching a 44,000-square-foot (4,100-square-metre) flagship store on London’s Regent Street recently, the company chose not only, as one might expect, to specify a range of premium materials for the fit-out, such as bronze, hand-made glass and wood-panelling, but to embed the latest digital technology into the building as a central part of the user experience – indeed, to view the store as an extension of the brand’s online presence. It’s no accident that the official Burberry press release chooses to describe the store as ‘the largest Burberry brand experience in the world’.

…and embedded radio-frequency identification technology, woven into selected garments and accessories, which triggers relevant multimedia content (such as footage from catwalk shows) on screens that double as changing-room mirrors

…and embedded radio-frequency identification technology, woven into selected garments and accessories, which triggers relevant multimedia content (such as footage from catwalk shows) on screens that double as changing-room mirrors

Visitors to the Regent Street brand temple (or ‘retail theatre concept’, as Burberry would also have it) are subjected to – if that’s the right expression – brand content delivered via 500 speakers and 100 screens throughout the space, as well as a 7-metre-high laser-phosphor display, the largest of its kind in the world. Satellite technology allows the live-streaming of events directly into the store and vice versa: an uplink facility enables events from the store, such as gigs, screenings and talks, to be broadcast live online.

Torafu Architects’ design for the Nike 1Love store in Tokyo employs a cylindrical, glass display wall to define its interior space. Its transparency gives the impression that the products it houses are floating in air; photo Daici Ano

Torafu Architects’ design for the Nike 1Love store in Tokyo employs a cylindrical, glass display wall to define its interior space. Its transparency gives the impression that the products it houses are floating in air; photo Daici Ano

The strategy here would seem to be fairly clear: to try to get Burberry’s online community of fans to take up residence as an in-house, embodied public. Just hang out for a while, why don’t you?
But there’s more to it than this. Getting your consumers to enter your stores is an effective means of profiling them, tracking them in-situ as they make their way through the decision-making process of what to buy and what not to. Embedded digital technology comes into play here; at Burberry’s London store, for example, radio-frequency identification technology (or RFID) is woven into selected garments and accessories, triggering relevant multimedia content, such as catwalk footage, on mirrors that turn into screens for example.

Beyond the customer experience that such wizardry creates, data gathering is the name of the game, and consumer data, as we know, can be a company’s greatest asset.

With the flow of information and content working in both directions – from the digital realm to the point of sale and the other way round, as in-store customer tracking is used in later online follow-up contact – retail spaces become, in effect, just another platform for brand activity. The German Design Council’s CEO, Andrej Kupetz, hit the nail on the head at a recent retail-design conference hosted by the foundation, describing the future of the physical retail environment as a ‘marketing device’.

On the one hand, as the rise of social media has shown us, we’re happy to sign up to a bit of fandom, to be one of many hundreds of thousands who choose to ‘like’ a brand. But if our encounter with the physical point of sale doesn’t leave us feeling good about ourselves – and central to this is feeling like an intelligent individual, capable of making our own choices as consumer – then this can only be to a brand’s detriment. When it comes to retail, we don’t like to sell ourselves short.


DORODESIGN LIKES: Converse – Spring/Summer 2013 – Greater China press preview

In addition to the Jordan Brand “Dare To Fly” event yesterday, Nike and its CONVERSE division organized a separate press/media event half way across the globe. Hidden within an alleyway eatery in Shanghai was the CONVERSE Spring/Summer 2013 Collection Preview for the Great China market. And while the venue was more subdued than Jordan Brand’s, the collection was anything but. With initiative like CONVERSE First String as the brand’s foundation, the “Chevron & Star” brand was able to add more silhouettes in the upcoming collection. This includes CONVERSE’s own version of Engineered Mesh and washed leather construct. Another was the continuation of the CONVERSE ♥ Marimekko collaboration, with even brighter and bolder patterns, and the addition of a reptilian design collection, in reference to the upcoming Chinese New Year. But for a more complete view of the product line, you might have to wait till next year

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DORODESIGN LIKES: Nike Blazer

La NIKE BLAZER nasce nel 1972 come una delle prime scarpe da basket, la prima realizzazione fu fatta completamente in pelle e divenne famosa grazie a George Gervin detto “The Icemen”, giocatore prima della ABA (storica lega rivale dell’ NBA) poi dell’NBA. La scarpa era facilmente riconoscibile grazie allo SWOOSH molto grande (big ass swoosh), utilizzato appositamente per fare in modo che la scarpa di vedesse in campo.

Da quando NIKE ha deciso di lanciarla nuovamente sul mercato, BLAZER è un autentico must per ogni appassionato di sneakers che abbia voglia di recuperare lo stile vintage secondo i canoni di oggi. E quando si parla di stile, sapete bene che c’è un solo urban refresher su cui potete contare!


DORODESIGN Likes: NIKE BLAZER HI VINTAGE – STUSSY INSPIRED PACK

10 years following Nike‘s joint venture with Stussy on two colorways of the Blazer Mid — back during a time when sneaker collaborations were a major event — Nike has dropped two styles of a Blazer Hi Vintage uncannily reminiscent of that 2002 co-branded release. Key differences from the originals include the Swoosh shape, vintage treatment and tumbled leather, as well as the high silhouette versus mid. Classic nylon foam tongues and leather lining round out the features. The Nike Blazer Hi Vintage — in Charcoal Grey/Green and Navy/Red — are limited to just 500 pairs and available exclusively at UK retailer size?.


DORODESIGN Likes: NIKE AIR FORCE 1 LOW – YEAR OF THE DRAGON | SPECIAL EDITION

Having reached the midpoint of the year, Nike is set to release its follow-up to the Air Force 1 “Year of the Dragon.” 2012 is known as “the Year of the Water Dragon,” and this interpretation of a dragon rising out of the sea conveys the idea of prosperity for all. This new model gives a nod to the dragon boat concept, featuring a red suede upper with unique embossed scale texture and bright blue leather overlay, as well as celebratory gold on the Swoosh. The multi-colored knitted tongue design represents the cultural features of the Dragon Boat Festival and best wishes for safety and health. A “dragon in the clouds” emblem on the tongue tag echoes its predecessor from the spring. A translucent blue outsole finishes the look, completing the imagery of a dragon boat floating on blue waters. The Nike Force 1 Low Year of the Dragon – Special Edition will arrive at select retailers on June 23rd.

Release Date: June 23rd, 2012 (Saturday)


DORODESIGN Likes: Nike Sky Force 88 Mid TXT – Action Red and Electric Green

Something quite interesting is in the works at Nike Sportswear by the way of Japanese retailerSOLEROOM. Buried among the current Jordan releases and the  Air Foamposite One “Galaxy” is a pair of  Sky Force 88 Mid, but not just your regular assortment of vintage re-issue. Rather, its a new interpretation of the classic with nylon upper and flashy tonal colorway in either Action Red or Electric Green. So far, there is no confirmation if they will be available elsewhere besides Japan, though both will make interesting additions to your spring/summer wardrobes.(via Freshnessmag).

Nike Sky Force 88 Mid TXT
Style: 488285-600
Color: Action Red/Action Red-Summit White

Style: 488285-300
Color: Electric Green/Electric Green-Summit White


DORODESIGN Likes: Nike Flyknit Technology & The HTM Collection

LIGHTER!

FASTER!

FORMFITTING!

Running revolutionized.
This is Nike Flyknit technology.
Coming this summer from Nike’s Innovation Kitchen.